Restoring a watershed

Planting trees, restoring habitat, and identifying and weeding out invasive species will be just some of the activities being held May 29 through May 31 at the RJ Haney House Park.   Students from South Canoe Elementary continue to work with a team of three biologists to monitor and restore the health of Canoe Creek watershed.

Canoe Creek runs adjacent to Hwy 97 near Salmon Arm and flows out to Shuswap Lake relatively parallel to the highway. Earlier in May the students completed their first batch of work, which was near the Salmon Arm Golf Course.

The activities that students will undertake this week at the RJ Haney House Park will be similar to the work they completed earlier in May.

  • Watershed station
  • Monitoring of aquatic invertebrates (bugs)
  • Water chemistry
  • Planting of six different species of trees
  • Clearing invasive plants
  • Monitoring traps for juvenile coho with help from fisheries

Students at South Canoe Elementary have been learning why salmon populations have been declined along this creek. They are also learning about things they can do to increase returns of spawning coho salmon along the creek.

The school is partnering with the Habitat Conservation Trust Foundation, Department of Fisheries and Oceans, Salmon Arm Golf Club, RJ Haney Museum, Kingfisher Interpretive Centre, local biologists, community members, and private residents in taking on this challenge.

“We aim to monitor the health of the creek at different locations and to offset human impacts on the creek by planting trees in select locations and clearing invasive plants,” explains teacher Ceren Caner.

“We had three biologists on hand, and many dedicated environmental educators including Kim Fulton who has helped spearhead this project.”

“Kim, who is a retired principal from our district, is a wonderful man that deserves special recognition for his commitment to environmental education and action!”

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